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Opinion
Opinion

No country for white men?

Why the Left should appeal to the white male identity ■ Matthew Johnson / Contributed Liberals and progressives, with the notable exception of Bernie Sanders, too often fail to appeal directly to white men in the United States. I am not suggesting that they fail to appeal to individual white men or that white men are not interested in their platform; I am suggesting that left-wing activists and politicians often do not even attempt to reach out to white men as a group. This is despite the left’s long-time embrace of identity politics. Why cede so much ground to the right? Why permit Fox News and other conservative media to target (more…)
Opinion

Newsom: Income equality is state’s biggest problem

■ By Thomas D. Elias / Contributed More than a year before he won election as California’s next governor, Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom did not hesitate for a moment when asked what’s California’s biggest problem. “Income inequality,” he said in an interview then. He repeated that evaluation in subsequent sit-downs during the campaign. “Take Los Angeles,” he said. “It’s America’s richest city, with Bel Air, Brentwood, Beverly Hills. But it’s also America’s poorest city, with South Central and more. The remarkable thing is they are only a few miles apart.” Then he added that, “You can’t live a good life in an unjust society.” He went on to quote the ancient Greek (more…)
Opinion

The real duty behind the badge

■ Rusty Strait / Senior Reporter I become nauseated when I hear comments about police and firemen not doing their job. I even hear it in our local coffee shops where folks gather to gossip. Let me explain the difference between the hard-working rank-and-file officers who put their lives on the line 24/7 for us, and the hierarchy. Night and day. The linemen on the street are not pencil pushers although the time it takes to write their reports takes away from the job they must do. Be that as it may, if you have ever ridden along in a patrol car on a Saturday night and saw the chances they (more…)
Opinion

How cozy should labor be with partisan politics?

■ Joey Aszterbaum / Contributed The Supreme Court of the United States’ ruling in Janus v. AFSCME dealt a serious blow to public employees’ labor rights. Because nearly five in six union members are public employees, it was a setback for the entire labor movement. If the Republican-controlled Congress had done their job and confirmed Merrick Garland as a Supreme Court Justice while President Obama was in office, it is very unlikely that the court wouldn’t have ruled against workers. In this era of political polarization, it would be easy to think that labor should be closely identified with the Democratic Party. Current Republican Party leadership is almost uniformly interested in (more…)
Opinion

LETTER TO THE EDITOR – November 22, 2018

Dear Editor, On Sept. 30, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) expired. This fund was 56 years old and has provided funding to keep public lands open for our hunters, anglers, sportshooters and outdoors enthusiasts Since its creation in 1964, the LWCF has provided $2.4 billion in funding to keep California public lands open, including our local San Bernardino National Forest. As a mother of six with children who have participated in scouting and other outdoor recreational activities, I know firsthand the value of outdoor recreation for our young people’s growth and development. As a taxpayer, I appreciate the LWCF contribution to our economy by supporting outdoor recreation jobs but (more…)
Opinion

The Red-Blue divide: Why beating ‘em is better than joining ‘em

■ Matthew Johnson / Contributed Unless I am in a particularly peaceful mood, I tend to scoff at the idea of building bridges between Democrats and Republicans in the United States. This is not an attitude I picked up post-election day 2016; I have felt this way since the Bush era — as I watched liberals capitulate to mindless “War on Terror” politics post-9/11. My inspiration for this seemingly bellicose attitude, ironically, comes from a Nobel Peace Prize laureate whose name is synonymous with nonviolence and social justice. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said that a “genuine leader is not a searcher for consensus but a molder of consensus.” I believe (more…)
Opinion

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Dear Editor, Thankfully the midterm election is over. However, it is unbelievable that 56 percent of California residents voted NOT to repeal the added gasoline taxes. Do you think these added taxes are going to go away? By voting NOT to repeal the tax, you are allowing the State Government to increase the tax on gasoline again and again. Since you have no problem paying not only the taxes on gasoline, but also the highest in the nation, would you be willing to pay to fill up my tank too? Nancy Eller, Hemet Dear Editor, Suggestions for City Council: The Sept. 25 Treasurer report shows a $36,273 withdrawal from LAIF. The (more…)
Opinion

The California Bullet Train Project

■ Calvin Porter / Staff Writer Much has been spoken and written for and against the multi-billion dollar mega project ($77 billion at last count) that when concluded should bring the railroad industry in the United States somewhat closer in this endeavor to other developed countries such as Japan, France, Germany, etc. that have been using high speed rail travel now for many years. For and against arguments from all aspects beginning with where all the money needed to complete the job is coming from, impact on the environment and on communities affected by the train’s transit through their towns and the need to legislate locally for this contingency, projections as (more…)
Opinion

The Inland Empire’s religious melting pot

Hemet serves the needs of many different faiths ■ By Ann Smith / Contributed I read with interest, Chris Smith’s article on the Presbyterian Church of Hemet in the Oct. 25 edition of The Valley Chronicle. I attended The Hollywood Presbyterian Church for several years myself while I was searching for my religious pathway. That was the period when the nationally recognized Rev. Lloyd John Ogilvie led a mega-congregation of 3,000 plus in the mid- to late 70’s. (Ogilvie was the Hollywood minister who in 1995 was elected U.S. Senate Chaplain but at the same time was the target of a lawsuit by a woman who claimed he talked her out (more…)
Opinion

A senior moment in Hemet

■ By Dolly Baxter / Contributed I decided to spend time with a senior citizen named Peggy who lives in a senior community for my observation report. She is a 91 year old woman who is recently widowed after 65 years of marriage and lives alone. She has a caregiver named Delores who comes in to help her three days a week, but for the remainder of the week she is alone. I chose Peggy to observe because she lives in the same community as my great aunt and I wanted to observe the behaviors of someone who used to live with a loved one for so long to then suddenly (more…)