LETTERS TO THE EDITOR – July 13, 2017

Government is a fearful master and a dangerous servant

Dear Editor,

George Washington was correct when he said that government was a fearful master and a dangerous servant. He was correct when he compared government to a forest fire. The larger the fire becomes, the harder it is to control. Congress has been pouring gasoline on the flames for more than 200 years.
Our government was created to protect the lives, liberty and property of the people, but gradually over time it has become the greatest threat to our peace and happiness.
In order to keep a fire under control, it needs to be monitored and supervised and the same is true for governments. Remember, a fire can cook your toast or burn your butt!
If the people do not control their government, their government controls them. Today our government is so big it cannot function properly. In order to control the government, we need to put it on a diet.
We need to stop spending money that we don’t have on things that we don’t need. The Constitution authorizes the federal government to spend money to pay its debts, provide for the common defense and to promote the general welfare.
When Congress allocates money for anything else, they have violated Constitution and need to be held accountable.

Sincerely,

Keith Broaders, Hemet


Vic Edelbrock was a great and knowledgeable guy and will be missed

Dear Editor,

I’m writing this letter to express my profound sadness at the passing of Vic Edelbrock.
In the mid ‘80s I transitioned from sports cars to hot rods. I soon discovered that hot rod equipment was not only as good as high quality European equipment but was one-third to half the cost. (A Porsche carburetor cost in the area of $900 as opposed to an Eldebrock carburetor that cost about $300 and went on a small block Chevy that cost one-fifth that of a Porsche engine.)
Being frugal, I went toward the big American equipment and hot rods in general. Edelbrock equipment was absolutely as good or better than anything in existence – quality built and worked great out of the box most of the time. (The manifold castings made in San Jacinto (I think) are definitely world-class castings.) The polished carburetors are things of beauty as well as quality. The Edelbrock company was and is first class.
The question now is how did that company come about and who was responsible?. It was Vic Sr. originally and then ultimately Vic Jr. who carried on and made the company we see today.
Twice I had occasion to talk to Vic Jr. The first time it was about tuning a carburetor and the second it was about brake cylinder bleeder valves.
Regarding the carburetor, I had called the tech line and was put on hold for about 35 minutes. I hung up and wrote him a letter explaining I’m an old man and don’t have time to spend listening to crappy music on his phone line.
About two weeks later, Vic called me and we talked for about 30 minutes where he apologized for the long delay and explained that he was having a problem at that time with that department. Then, Vic gave me a phone number that I thought was the secret number to the tech department but he said no, “that is my personal number.”
He was an absolute gentleman, friendly and so easy to get along with. At the end of the conversation he asked if I needed a hat and being bald I said “absolutely.” One week later I received a bright red baseball hat with the word “Edelbrock” embroidered on the front and autographed with “Vic” on the bill.
We had a similar discussion about the brake cylinder bleeder valves about 10 years later. At the end of that conversation he asked if I needed a hat and again I said absolutely.
In the last 15 years I’ve reverted to vintage stock automobiles as you can see below, but I miss that Edelbrock quality and price.

Sincerely,

John Morris, Placentia


Thank you

Dear Editor,

Thank you for being there and fighting for us Hemet citizens (and seniors).

Sincerely,

Dina Little

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